What are the psychological and developmental differences between learning a first and second language

What are the psychological and developmental differences between learning a first and second language

Learning a second language is a similar method to learning a first language in that one undergoes developmental phases and depend on native speakers to give good comprehensible models of the language. This extraordinarily fast progress appears to ‘fly in the face’ of several acknowledged facts regarding the nature of language – so much so that it has turn out to be commonly recognized within the scientific society to consider language as well as learning as one of various totally unexplainable ambiguities that overwhelmed people in their lives on a daily basis. Even the cleverest of scientists in the present day do not know where to start with attempting to unravel the variety of intricacies that all of language carries. Nevertheless, the child moves forward, apparently with little regard to this alleged anonymity and continues with little effort to break the ‘revered system’. To begin with, parents give very little in the way of language training to the child. opposite to what some might accept as true, parents do not instruct their children to talk. The majority of parents would not even have the means in which to explain language clearly to a child even if they would like to do so. Actually, parents use the majority of time correcting falsehoods instead of correcting incorrect grammars. If someone is a casual observer, he would believe children grow-up being little lawyers trying to find out facts instead of little linguists trying to find out proper assumptions to their language. … By the time a child is 5 years old he has developed an intricate verbal language structure and can communicate his requirements, wants, feelings and emotions. However, there is still a long way to go. From the ages of 6 to 12 years, children carry on to make their verbal language more refined and become skilled at reading and writing for a range of contexts. Even as grown-ups, people carry on to develop the first language – including fresh expressions, developing more intricate reading, and writing expertise. Learning a second language is as well a continuing procedure. One can never actually declare that he is completely familiar with a language. Learning a second language is a similar method to learning a first language in that one undergoes developmental phases and depend on native speakers to give good comprehensible models of the language. However, several other factors have an effect on it, including what the first language is, how educated the individual is in his first language and the child’s approach to the new language and culture (O’Malley amp. Chamot, p. 129, 1990). Proficiency in the first language is very critical in developing proficiency in a second language. If the child can shift abilities from the first to the second language learning, the new language will be a lot simpler. These not just incorporate literacy abilities but also educational proficiencies, thinking skills, subject understanding and learning approach (Bhatia amp. Ritchie, p. 236, 2009). A lot of individuals believe that young children are the most excellent language learners. One of the huge benefits of younger language learners is that they develop outstanding accent skills. however, younger language learners run the threat of learning a

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