Is There Any Significant Relation Between Test Results and Student Merit?

Is There Any Significant Relation Between Test Results and Student Merit?

Is There Any Significant Relation Between Test Results and Student Merit?

Test scores are often basis for a high schools performance and admission to college. But does this show significance in the overall learning of a student? Let’s examine.

According to FairTest (The National Center for Fair and Open Testing), Over 815 colleges and universities across the U.S. do not primarily rely on test scores as basis for admission and merit.

However, test scores in many parts of the world are often used as the standards for accomplishment, why did most of the schools districts, colleges, and universities ignore such academic measurement?

FairTest found out that “test scores do not equal merit”; to summarize the results. Colleges and Universities which chose optional standardized SAT or ACT results had more diversity in the student body—concluding that a “test score optional” policy promotes equality.

In a layman’s view, students which do not score high in SAT or ACT should not be saddled together; this shows more of sorting than teaching. Education should be for everybody and understanding that all students differ in learning can provide ways to developed everyone’s potential.

Second, the high schools, colleges, and universities which deemphasized the use of ACT or SAT are developing more ways to resolve the admission dilemma—penetrating more emphasis on classroom performance as the measure of excellence rather than test scores.

Third, the advantages of dropping test scores can be studied by test running organizations. Dropping test scores means diversity; therefore minorities, low income, first generation, and other students can apply.

Analyzing the report can give us an insight whether test scores should be strictly imposed. Though, test scores have been there for decades, finding alternative ways in the education system and strengthening the education program can be the best way. Remember that schools exist to teach elementary, secondary, and higher education students and not merely to sort them.