R Research Proposal How are Aggressive TV Cartoons Affecting Childrens

R Research Proposal How are Aggressive TV Cartoons Affecting Childrens

Annotated Bibliography Bjorkqvist, Kaj, and Kirsti Lagerspetz. Childrens Experience of Three Types of Cartoon at Two Age Levels. International Journal of Psychology 20.1 (1985): 77. Business Source Complete. Web. 29 Oct. 2014.This article discusses how children react to different types of cartoons. It focused on two different age levels, namely 5 to 6 years and 9 years. After watching the different types of cartoons, interview sessions followed that sought to highlight the experiences of the children as well as the type of emotions evoked by the cartoons. After a period of six months, children belonging to the younger group could only remember the cartoons that had contributed to a lot of anxiety in them. Children who liked aggressive cartoons exhibited a low level of moral reasoning and were more excited about seeing violent cartoons. They seemed to approve the behavior of the violent characters and gave explanations to justify their violent behavior. Being a primary source, this article is very reliable in helping one explain the effects of aggressive cartoons on children. The author targets an educated audience because of the language and structure used in the paper. This article will be of critical use in my research paper because it exhibits the reality of aggressive cartoons having adverse effects on children. Ergün, Sibel. The Influence of Violent TV Cartoons Watched By School Children in Turkey. Acta Paulista De Enfermagem (2012): SciELO. Web. 29 Oct. 2014.The author of this article adopts an approach that is rarely used by other scholars in a bit to understand the effect of aggressive cartoons in children. The author sought to describe the gender specific impact of aggressive cartoons. Notably, it is evident that boys and girls present different frequencies of watching TV cartoons, and are affected differently by aggressive cartoons. The research focused on 300 students, a representative sample chosen from different schools. Face to face interviews were conducted in an effort to collect data concerning the views of children about the impact of violence oriented cartoons. According to the results, girls and boys had varying prevalence of their favorite cartoon programs. It emerged that male children registered a higher level of influence from violent cartoons compared to girls. Moreover, boys were more likely to imitate characters from violent cartoons. The author’s approach was successful and the source proofs to be highly reliable because it is a primary research article. Since the author adopted a case study research, which focused on children in Turkey, the source can be used to explain the influence of TV cartoons in the region. In the research paper, these findings can be compared to other studies in different regions. Gülay, Hülya. The Evaluation of the Relationship between the Tv-Viewing Habits and Peer Relations of Preschool Children. International Journal of Academic Research 3.2 (2011): 922-930. Academic Search Complete. Web. 29 Oct. 2014.This article sought to highlight the effects of TV-viewing habits on the peer relationships with children. The author sought to assess whether TV viewing patterns affected the capacity of children to develop peer relationships. It focused on a sample of 126 children as well as their mothers and fathers. The study revealed that TV viewing was becoming a major determinant of the social behavior exhibited by children, their aggression levels, fear-anxiety, victimization, a social behavior, and exclusion. More specifically, the article highlights that children who watched television in the presence of their siblings and friends exhibited a higher number of friends. Children who had the habit of watching TV in the presence of their parents exhibited advanced prosocial levels. The study also reveals that leaving children to watch television alone increased their chances of exhibiting aggression and antisocial behavior. The findings in this research are of significant contribution because they can inform the argument on the potential effects of adverse cartoons and TV viewing habits of children. The author adopts an authoritative tone because the article is addressed to scholars. The article is important in presenting the background information for a research paper because it offers general views on the effects of TV viewing habits of children. Hapkiewicz, Walter G., and Aubrey H. Roden. The Effect of Aggressive Cartoons on Childrens Interpersonal Play. Child Development 42.5 (1971): 1583. Publisher Provided Full Text Searching File. Web. 29 Oct. 2014.The authors of this article sought to present their findings on the effects of aggressive cartoons on the capacity of children to engage in interpersonal play. This article is one of the oldest sources that sought to assess the adverse effects of aggressive cartoons on children. The study considered the behavior of three groups of children, which consisted of a group exposed to an aggressive cartoon, a second group that watched a non-aggressive cartoon, and the third group that did not watch any cartoon. Findings from this study indicated that there was a lack of any significant difference of the level of aggression in the three groups. However, the study revealed that boys were more likely to exhibit violent behavior compared to girls. The findings in this research are of critical significance because they present one of the earliest studies on the effects of aggressive cartoons on the behavior of children. The purpose of the research was to understand the potential influence of violent cartoons on the development of children. Therefore, this source will be of use in my research paper as one of the earliest researches concerning this subject.Work CitedBjorkqvist, Kaj, and Kirsti Lagerspetz. Childrens Experience of Three Types of Cartoon at Two Age Levels. International Journal of Psychology 20.1 (1985): 77. Business Source Complete. Web. 29 Oct. 2014.Ergün, Sibel. The Influence of Violent TV Cartoons Watched By School Children in Turkey. Acta Paulista De Enfermagem (2012): SciELO. Web. 29 Oct. 2014.Gülay, Hülya. The Evaluation of the Relationship between the Tv-Viewing Habits and Peer Relations of Preschool Children. International Journal of Academic Research 3.2 (2011): 922-930. Academic Search Complete. Web. 29 Oct. 2014.Hapkiewicz, Walter G., and Aubrey H. Roden. The Effect of Aggressive Cartoons on Childrens Interpersonal Play. Child Development 42.5 (1971): 1583. Publisher Provided Full Text Searching File. Web. 29 Oct. 2014.

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