Private High Schools Face Recession Head On

Private High Schools Face Recession Head On

Even when recession is challenging private high schools in the United States and other countries of the world, still these schools owned by private companies and corporations manage to face the challenge head on. Although many of these schools have confirmed their operation is a little bit shaken by the recession.

In Asheville, the private high schools remain steadfast and steady despite day to day challenges as a result of the recession which now created attention in many schools world wide. In fact, a few months ago, private schools began bracing themselves to survive the crisis brought about by lower enrollment numbers, more requests for financial aids as well as decreasing endowments. It is also observed in some states of the US that the falling endowments as well as the increased demands for scholarships, is not threatening parents to sacrifice the private education of their children.

Private High Schools Face Recession Head On

Andrew Hirt, Asheville School admission director, said instead of getting affected by the recession the schools still manage to enroll considerable number of students and they are even hitting the maximum expected student capacity. He said students are returning because they believe in the school’s very distinctive value.

Hirt is even very hopeful that the Asheville School, which is a boarding high school, will still experience the much awaited highest retention rate. The record shows that of the 200 recorded families there are now 186 returning which is a very good ratio because it is 93 percent retention rate. He said at least 88 percent of the school’s students return every year. The Rainbow Mountain Children’s School is also expected to retain its enrolled students this year according to a very reliable source.

Stephen Robinson, Southern Association of Independent Schools also said most of their private schools experienced consistent enrollment ratio and called this a very promising turn out of students for this year. He said this only means that the parents of these students have committed to private education because they want quality. They don’t mind the high cost of education in private schools as long as they are assured their children get the best education.